Further Reading

By Nicholas DeFillipo
With contributions regarding image citations from Julie Scully

Throughout the years, there has been an abundance of scholarship on Apuleius’ The Golden Ass.  The following page is by no means a comprehensive list, but, rather, provides a starting point for the topics and themes discussed within the website for those readers who have found their curiosity piqued. (As curious as you are, please, do not open the box.)  

 

Apuleius:

– Apuleius. “The Defense, Translated by H.E. Butler.” Classics Department of MIT. http://classics.mit.edu/Apuleius/apol.1.1.html.

– Harrison, S.J. Apuleius: A Latin Sophist. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.

– Hunink, Vincent. “The Prologue of Apuleius’ “De Deo Socratis”” Mnemosyne, Fourth Series, 48, no. 3 (1995): 292-312. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4432504.

– MacLennan, Bruce J. “Apuleius of Madauros.” University of Tennessee, Knoxville. https://web.eecs.utk.edu/~mclennan/papers/Apuleius-long.htm.

– Purser, L.C. “Notes on Apuleius’ “De Mundo”” Hermathena 16, no. 37 (1911): 248-63. http://www.jstor.org/stable/23036943.

– Cf. Winkler, John J. Auctor & Actor: A Narratological Reading of Apuleius’ Golden Ass. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1985.

 

Latin Texts of The Golden Ass:

– Gaselee, Stephen, ed. The Golden Ass of Apuleius. London: William Heinemann; New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1915.

This is a Latin text of the entire The Golden Ass.

– Krumpak, Karen, Evan Hayes, and Stephen Nimis. Apuleius’ Cupid and Psyche: An Intermediate Latin Reader. Faenum Publishing, Ltd., 2015.
http://www.faenumpublishing.com/uploads/2/3/9/8/23987979/apuleius_cupid_and_psyche_an_intermediate_latin_reader.pdf

Apuleius’ Cupid and Psyche: An Intermediate Latin Reader is a version of the Cupid and Psyche text edited for intermediate Latin students.  The text provides both page by page vocabulary, saving students time with dictionaries and glossaries, as well as helpful grammar notes.  

The Latin Library 

Perseus Digital Library

 

English Translations of The Golden Ass:

Listed below are various English translations of the entire text. It is helpful to have more than one as each translator has a slightly different style. Browse through to find the one that best suits your needs.

Capps’ Translation

– Apuleius. The Golden Ass. Translated by E.J. Kenney. London: Penguin Books, 2004.

– Kline, A.S., trans. The Metamorphoses of Apuleius. Poetry in Translation, last modified  2013. http://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Latin/TheGoldenAssI.htm

Project Gutenburg (Adlington 1566 translation)

– Ruden, Sarah, trans. The Golden Ass of Apuleius, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2012.

– (1903) Stuttaford and Mothersole: https://books.google.com/books?id=h0NiAAAAMAAJ&pg=PR1#v=onepage&q&f=false

– Walsh, P.G., trans. The Golden Ass of Apuleius. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995.

 

Latin Text of other works by Apuleius:

 Apologia (Georgetown)

Apologia (The Latin Library)

Apologia (Perseus)

– Florida (The Latin Library)

– Florida (Perseus)

– De Platone et Dogmate Eius (The Latin Library)

– De Deo Socratis (The Latin Library)

– De Mundo (The Latin Library)

 

English Translations of other works by Apuleius:

– Butler, H.E., trans. The Defense of Apuleius. Classics Department of MIT, last modified 2009. http://classics.mit.edu/Apuleius/apol.1.1.html

– Apologia (Georgetown, 1966)

De Deo Socratis (Perseus) Gurney, Hudson 1910 translation

– Florida (Attulus) H. E. Butler 1909 translation

– Florida (Project Gutenburg) H. E. Butler 1909 translation

– De Platone et Dogmate Eius (English Audio) Burges 1854 translation

– De Platone et Dogmate Eius (text) Burges 1854 translation

 

A link to Till We Have Faces, a C.S. Lewis novel based off of the Cupid and Psyche story:

https://treeofideas.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/books-till-we-have-faces-a-myth-retold.pdf

 

Information on Lucan and The Onos:

Apuleius worked off of Lucius, The Ass, which may have been written by a Lucius of Patrae, and an epitome written by Lucian titled The Onos.

– Lucian. Lucius, or The Ass.” Trans. M.D. Macleod. http://www.attalus.org/translate/lucius.html

– “The Lucian of Samosata Project.” http://lucianofsamosata.info/

Literary Studies:

– Finklepearl, Ellen D. The Metamorphoses of Language. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2001.

– Harrison, Stephen J. “Apuleius’ Metamorphoses.” In The Novel in the Ancient World, edited by Gareth Schmeling, 491-516. Leiden: Brill, 1996.

– Harrison, Stephen. “Literary texture in the adultery-tales of Apuleius Metamorphoses Book 9,” in Desultoria Scientia: Genre in Apuleius’ Metamorphoses and related texts, edited by Ruurd R. Nauta, Caeculus 5. Leuven, Belgium: Peeters Press, 2006.

– Osborne-Bartucca, Kristen. Suduiko, Aaron, ed. “The Golden Ass Characters,” GradeSaver. http://www.gradesaver.com/the-golden-ass/study-guide/character-list

– Perry, B.E. The Ancient Romances: A Literary-Historical Account of Their Origins. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1967.

– Winkler, John J. Auctor & Actor: A Narratological Reading of Apuleius’ Golden Ass. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1985.

 

Religious Studies:

Within The Golden Ass, religion plays a major role whether it be the tale of Cupid and Psyche, or a passing reference to Christianity.  Not only that, it also influenced later Christian authors and thinkers.  However, the most overtly religious element of the novel is Book XI, which focuses almost entirely on the mystery cults of Isis and Osiris.  There have been copious amounts of scholarship on the meaning and significance of Book XI.

– Bohm, Robert Karl. “The Isis Episode in Apuleius.” Classical Journal 68, no. 3 (1973): 228-231.

– Dods, Marcus, trans. The City of God of Augustine. Translated by Marcus Dods. Chicago: Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc. 1952.

– Frangoulidis, Stavros. Witches, Isis and Narrative: Approaches to Magic in Apuleius’ Metamorphoses. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2008.

– Fredouille, Jean Claude. Apulée Metamorphoses, Livre XI. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1975.

– Futre Pinheiro, Marília P. Bierl, Anton Beck, Roger. 2013. Intende, Lector – Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel. Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter. Accessed April 29, 2017. ProQuest Ebook Central.

– Griffiths, John Gwyn. Apuleius of Madauros: The Isis-Book. Leiden: Brill, 1975.

– Kenney, E.J. “In the Mills with Slaves: Lucius Looks Back in Gratitude.” TAPA 133 (2003): 159-192.

– Libby, Brigitte B. “Moons, Smoke, and Mirrors in Apuleius’ Portrayal of Isis.” American Journal of Philology 132, no. 2 (2011): 301-322.

– Merkelbach, Reinhold. Roman und Mysterium in der Antike. Munich: Beck, 1962.

– Pusey, Edward Bouverie, trans. The Confessions of Augustine. Translated by Edward Bouverie Pusey. Chicago: Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc. 1952.

– Van der Paardt, R. Th. “The Unmasked ‘I,’ Apuleius, Met. XI 27.” Mnemosyne 34 (1981): 96-106

 

Conversion and Transformation:  

– Bradley, Keith. “Contending with Conversion: Reflections on the Reformation of Lucius the Ass.” Phoenix 52, no. 3/4 (1998): 315-334.

– Shumate, Nancy. Crisis and Conversion in Apuleius’ Metamorphoses. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996.

 

Fairy Tales:  

Within the Cupid and Psyche story, there are striking similarities to modern fairy tales. This is no coincidence, as fairy tales often draw from ancient myth and folk tales for inspiration.

– Aarne, Antti. The Types of the Folktale, Translated by Stith Thompson. Helsinki: Suomalainen Tiedeakatemia Academia Scientiarum Fennica, 1973.

– Anderson, Graham. Fairytale in the Ancient World. New York: Routledge, 2000.

– Bottingheimer, Ruth B. “Cupid and Psyche vs. Beauty and the Beast: The Milesian and the Modern.” Merveilles & contes 3, no. 1 (1989): 4-14.

– Brown, Thomas H. “The Relationship Between ‘Partonopeus de Blois’ and the Cupid and Psyche Tradition.” Brigham Young University Studies 5, no. 3/4 (1964): 193-202.

– Hansen, William. Ariadne’s Thread: A Guide to International Tales Found in Classical Literature. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002.

– Lieberman, Marcia R. “‘Some Day My Prince Will Come’: Female Acculturation through Fairy Tale.” College English 34, no. 3 (1972): 383-395.

– Tatar, Maria. The Annotated Classic Fairy Tales. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2002.

– Zipes, Jack. “The Meaning of Fairy Tale within the Evolution of Culture.” Marvels & Tales 25, no. 2 (2011): 221-243.

– Zipes, Jack. Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion. New York: Routledge, 2012.

 

Suicide:

– Michalopoulos, Andreas N. “Lucius’ Suicide Attempts in Apuleius’ ‘Metamorphoses,’” The Classical Quarterly, 52, no. 2 (April 27, 2017), http://www.jstor.org/stable/3556417

 

Curiosity:

– G.N. Sandy, “Knowledge and Curiosity in Apuleius’ “Metamorphoses,” Latomas 31, no. 1 (April 26, 2017), http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.stockton.edu/stable/41528349

 

Magic:  

From the start of the novel, magic is presented as one of the main motifs. Magic ultimately leads to Lucius’ transformation into an ass from a human and from an ass back into a human.

– Johnson, Marguerite. 2011. “Witches, Isis and Narrative: Approaches to Magic in Apuleius’ Metamorphosis.” Magic, Ritual & Witchcraft 6, no. 2: 219-221. Literary Reference Center, EBSCOhost (accessed April 29, 2017).

– Leinweber, David Walter. “Witchcraft and Lamiae in “The Golden Ass”” Folklore 105 (1994): http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.stockton.edu/stable/1260631

 

Philosophy:  

Wildberg, Christian, “Neoplatonism”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2016 Edition), edited by Edward N. Zalta, Standford University. https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/spr2016/entries/neoplatonism

 

Citations for Images found on this site:

Adriaen De Vries, Mercury and Psyche. 1593. Adriaen De Vries. Bronze, 215cm.
Musée du Louvre, Paris. From: The Web Gallery of Art, http://www.wga.hu.

——— Psyche with Pandora’s Box. 1593. Bronze, 187cm. National Museum, Stockholm. From: The Web Gallery of Art, http://www.wga.hu.

– Alphonse Legros, Cupid and Psyche. 1867 Oil paint on canvas, 1168 x 1414 mm. Tate Gallery, London. From: Tate Gallery, http://www.tate.org.uk.

– Sir Anthony van Dyck, Cupid and Psyche. 1639-40. Oil on canvas. Privy Chamber, Kensington Palace. From: The Royal Collection, http://www.royalcollection.org.uk.

– Anonymous Italian, Apuleius (Lucius Apuleius). 1685. Engraving. The Warburg Institute Library, London. Available from: ARTstor, http://www.artstor.org (accessed May 2, 2017).

– Anonymous, Lucius Eating Roses which will Change Him back into a Man. ca.1477, woodcut. From: The Illustrated Bartsch, Vol. 81. Available from: Artstor.

– Antonio Canova, Psyche Revived by Cupid’s Kiss. 1777. Marble, 1.55×1.68m. Paris, Musée du Louvre. From: The Louvre, http://www.musee.louvre.fr.

– Barry Johnston, Psyche and Cupid. 1984. 22″ high x 70″ high, Bronze. Sculptor Johnston. From: The Sculptor Johnson, http://www.sculptorjohnston.com.

Beauty and the Beast. Movie. Directed by Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise. 1991. Burbank, CA: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, 1992.

–  Bissen, H.W. Statue of Psyche. 1798 1868. Marble, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen. Accessed May 3, 2017.

– Byzantinischer Mosaizist. Bodenmosaik, Szene: Kind und Ese, 5th Century. Mosaic, Schule von Konstantinopel. Accessed May 1, 2017.

– Caraglio, Cupid and Psyche. c.16th century. Reduced Copy of Caraglio’s engraving after Perino del Vaga from The Loves of the Gods. Engraving, 12.2 x 7.5 cm. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, San Francisco. From: http://www.art.famsf.org.

Cinderella. Movie. Directed by Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske, and Wilfred Jackson. 1950. Burbank, CA: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, 1988.

– Colorful smoke. Digital Image. Desktopanimated.com. Accessed May 1, 2017. http://www.nmgncp.com/cool-abstract-hd-wallpaper/4191729.html

– Cupid and Psyche. Digital Image. Jontyhurwitz.com. Accessed April 14, 2017. http://www.jontyhurwitz.com/canova/

– Cupid and Psyche Statue. Digital Image. Thesecretgreece.com. Accessed May 1, 2017.

– Domenico Corvi, Cupid and Psyche. 1784. Oil on canvas, 172×121 cm. State Hermitage Museum. From: Art Hermitage, http://www.arthermitage.org.

– Edmund Dulac, Cinderella. 1910, Illustration. Gutenberg Project. From: Arthur

– Quiller-Couch and Charles Perrault, The Sleeping Beauty and Other Fairy Tales. New York: Hodder & Stoughton, 1910.

– Sir Edward Burne-Jones, Pan and Psyche. 1872-1874. Oil on canvas, 25.6 x 21 in. Harvard Art Museum. From: Harvard Art Museum, http://www.harvardartmuseums.org.

– Edward Coley Burne-Jones, The Wedding of Psyche. 1895. Oil on canvas. Musée des Beaux-Arts, Brussels. From: Victorian Web, http://www.victorianweb.org.

– Edward Matthew Hale, Psyche at the Throne of Venus. 1883. Oil on canvas, 199x89cm. Russell-Cotes Art Gallery & Museum. From: ArtUK, http://www.artuk.org.

– Ernst Klimt, Pan Consoling Psyche. 1892. Oil on canvas. Private Collection. From: The Athenaeum, http://www.the-athenaeum.org.

– Eugene-Ernest Hillemacher, Psyche in the Underworld (Psyché aux enfers). 1865. Oil on canvas. National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. From: National Gallery of Victoria, http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au.

– Francois-Eduoard Picot, Cupid and Psyche. c. 1817. Oil on canvas. Private collection. From: The Web Gallery of Art, http://www.wga.hu.

– Francois-Nicolas Delaistre, Cupid and Psyche. c.1775-1777. Marble. Paris, Musée du Louvre. From: The Louvre, http://www.cartelfr.louvre.fr.

– Giordano, Luca, Psyche Honored by the People, 1692 – 1702. Oil on Copper. 57.5 cm. x 68.9 cm. Royal Collection, Windsor Castle. Accessed May 1, 2017.

– Giovanni Battista Foggini, Cupid and Psyche. c. 1710. Bronze with brown patina and red-gold lacquer, 13.4 x 14.6 x 9.25 in. Detroit Institute of Arts. From: DIA, http://www.dia.org.

– Girl by Water. Digital Image. YouTube.com. Accessed May 1, 2017.

– Giulio Romano, Psyche Appealing in Vain to Juno. 1526-28. Fresco. Sala di Psiche, Rome, Italy. From: The Web Gallery of Art, http://www.wga.hu.

– The Goddess Fortuna. Digital Image. Chalquist.com Accessed April 14, 2017. http://www.chalquist.com/fortuna.html

– The Goddess Isis. Digital Image. Keyword-suggestions.com. Accessed April 14, 2017. http://www.keyword-suggestions.com/ZWd5cHRpYW4gZ29kIGlzaXM/

– Gustave Doré, Barbe Bleue (Blue Beard). 1862, Illustration, woodcut, 33 x 27cm. National Library of France, Paris. From: Charles Perrault, Les Contes de Perrault (The Tales of Perrault). Paris: Jules Hetzel, 1862.

– Hendrik Goltzius after Bartholomaeus Spranger, Feast of the Gods at the Marriage of Cupid and Psyche. 1587. Engraving from three plates printed on three sheets of attached laid paper. The National Gallery of Art. From: NGA, http://www.nga.gov.

– Henrietta Rae, Sketch for Psyche before the Temple of Venus. 1894. Oil on canvas 18.5×30.5in. Private Collection. From: Sothebys, http://www.sothebys.com.

– Henry-Joseph Rutxhiel, Zéphyr and Psyché. c.1814. Marble, 1.62×1.41m; Musée du Louvre. From: The Louvre, http://www.cartelfr.louvre.fr.

– Isis. Digital Image. Goddess.ws. Accessed May 1, 2017.

– Jacopo Zucchi, Amor and Psyche. 1589. Oil on canvas, 68.1 × 51.2 in. Galleria Borghese, Rome, Italy. From: Wikipedia, http://www.wikipedia.org.

– Jacques-Louis David, Cupid and Psyche. 1817. Oil on canvas, unframed: 72.5 x 95 in. The Cleveland Museum of Art. From: ClevelandArt, http://clevelandart.org.

– Jean-Baptiste de Poilly, Isis (Iside). 1704. Engraving. The Warburg Institute Library, London. Available from: ARTstor, http://www.artstor.org (accessed May 2, 2017).

Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Psyche showing her Sisters her Gifts from Cupid. c. 1753. Oil on canvas, 168.3 x 192.4 cm. The National Gallery, London. From: The National Gallery, http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk.

– John William Waterhouse, Psyche Opening the Golden Box. 1903. Oil on canvas. Private Collection. From: J.W. Waterhouse, http://www.jwwaterhouse.com.

– Josiah Wedgwood, The Marriage of Cupid and Psyche. c.1780–1800. Jasperware, 2.75×3.5in. Ceramics-Pottery. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. From: The MET, http://www.metmuseum.org.

– Joseph-Mare Vien, Psyche Reconnaisant L’Amour Endormi. 1761. Bas-relief. Musée de France. From: The Museum of France, http://www.culture.gouv.fr.

– Luca Giordano, Psyche Honoured by the People. c.1695-7. Oil on copper. Cumberland Art Gallery, Hampton Court Palace, England. From: The Royal Collection, http://www.royalcollection.org.uk.

——– Psyche’s Parents Offering Sacrifice to Apollo. 1692-1702. Oil on copper, 56.2 x 69.2 cm. Royal Collection, Windsor. From: The Web Gallery of Art, http://www.wga.hu.

——– Psyche Served by Invisible Spirits. 1692-1702. Oil on copper, 57.8 x 68.9 cm. Royal Collection, Windsor, England. From: The Web Gallery of Art, http://www.wga.hu.

– Lucius the Donkey. Digital Image. Faculty.vassar.edu. Accessed May 1, 2017.

– Master of the Die, Cupid Fleeing from Psyche. c1530-1560. Engraving in warm brown ink on cream laid paper, 270 x 370 mm (sheet). The Art Institute of Chicago. From: ARTIC: http://www.artic.edu.

——– Cupid in Pscyhe’s Arms. c1530-1560. Engraving in warm brown ink on cream laid paper, 270 x 370 mm (sheet). Art Institute of Chicago. From: ARTIC, http://www.artic.edu.

——– The Gods Celebrating the Wedding of Psyche and Cupid. c1530-1560. Engraving in warm brown ink on cream laid paper, 270 x 370 mm (sheet). Art Institute of Chicago. From: ARTIC, http://www.artic.edu.

——– Psyche Taken to a Deserted Mountain (“Marriage of Death”). c1530-1560. Engraving in warm brown ink on cream laid paper, 270 x 370 mm (sheet). Art Institute of Chicago. From: ARTIC, http://www.artic.edu.

——– Other Nymphs Serving Psyche at the Table. c1530-1560. Engraving in warm brown ink on cream laid paper, 270 x 370 mm (sheet). Art Institute of Chicago. From: ARTIC, http://www.artic.edu.

——– The People Rendering Divine Honors to Psyche. ca1530-1560. Engraving in warm brown ink on cream laid paper, 270 x 370 mm (sheet). The Art Institute of Chicago. From: ARTIC, http://www.artic.edu.

——– Psyche Gives Presents to Her Sisters. c1530-1560. Engraving in warm brown ink on cream laid paper, 270 x 370 mm (sheet). Art Institute of Chicago. From: ARTIC, http://www.artic.edu.

——– Psyche Embarks in Charon’s Boat. c1530-1560. Engraving in warm brown ink on cream laid paper, 270 x 370 mm (sheet). Art Institute of Chicago. From: ARTIC, http://www.artic.edu.

——– Psyche’s Father Consulting the Oracle. ca1530-1560. Engraving in warm brown ink on cream laid paper, 270 x 370 mm (sheet); Art Institute of Chicago. From: ARTIC, http://artic.edu.

——– Sorrow and Pain Punishing Psyche. c1530-1560. Engraving in warm brown ink on cream laid paper, 270 x 370 mm (sheet). Art Institute of Chicago. From: ARTIC, http://www.artic.edu.

– Maurice Denis, Psyche Discovers that Her Mysterious Lover is Eros. c.1908. Oil on Canvas. State Hermitage Museum. From: The Art History Museum, http://www.arthistoryproject.com.

——– Jupiter Bestows Immortality on Psyche. 1908. Oil on canvas, 399x272cm. State Hermitage Museum. From: The Art History Project, http://www.arthistoryproject.com.

——– Zephyr Transporting Psyche to the Island of Delight. c.1908. Oil on Canvas, 395 x 267.5cm. State Hermitage Museum, England. From: The Art History Project, http://www.arthistoryproject.com.

– Michelangelo Palloni, Stygian Dream of Psyche. c.1690. Fresco. North Gallery in Wilanow Palace. From: ArtYZM, http://www.artyzm.com.

– Neoplatonic Chart. Digital Image. Pinterest.com. Accessed April 14, 2017. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/575897871086308328/

– Paul Alfred de Curzon, Psyche in the Underworld. 1840-1859. Oil on canvas. Leipzig, Germany. From: Wikipedia, http://www.wikipedia.org.

– Perino del Vaga, The Marriage of Cupid and Psyche. (1545-47). Fresco. Sala Paolina, Castel Sant’Angelo, Rome. From: The Web Gallery of Art, http://wga.hu.

– Pierre Courteys, Plaque with Scene of the Adoration of Psyche. 1560. Grisaille enamel, flesh tones, and gold on copper, 8 7/16 in. LACMA, Los Angeles. From: LACMA, http://www.lacma.org.

——– Plaque with Scene of an Old Woman Narrating the Story of Psyche. 1560. Polychrome enamel, gold on copper with foil, 12 x 8 11/16 in. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles. From: LACMA, http://www.lacma.org.

——– Plate with Scene of Psyche Carried by Zephyr to Cupid’s Palace. c.1560. Grisaille enamel, flesh tones, and gold on copper, 8 7/16 in. Los Angeles County Museum of Art. From: LACMA, http://www.lacma.org.

– Pieter de Jode, Design for a Salver with the Story of Cupid and Psyche. 16th century. Pen and brown ink, brown wash, over black chalk, on paper, 11 x15.5 in; The Morgan Library and Museum, New York. From: The Morgan Library and Museum, http://www.themorgan.org.

– Pietro Tenerani, Psyche Fainting. 1834. Marble. Museo Nacional de San Carlos in Mexico City. From: Wikipedia, http://wikipedia.org.

– Plato. Digital Image. Wikipedia.org. Accessed April 14, 2017.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neoplatonism

– Polidoro da Caravaggio, Psyche Abandoned. 1527-8. Oil on pine panel. State
Bedroom, Windsor Castle, England. From: The Royal Collection,
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk.

– Raphael and his workshop, Brings Psyche Up to Olympus. 1517-18. Fresco. Loggia di Psiche in the Villa Farnesina, Rome. From: The Web Gallery of Art, http://www.wga.hu.

——– Psyche Gives Venus the Vessel. 1517-18. Fresco. The Loggia di Psiche in the Villa Farnesina, Rome. From: The Web Gallery of Art, http://www.wga.hu.

Reinhold Begas, Cupid and Psyche. c.1854-57. Marble. Alte Nationalgalerie, Berlin. From: Wikipedia, http://www.wikipedia.org.

——– Mercury and Psyche. 1857. Marble. Staatliche Museen, Berlin. From: The Web Gallery of Art, http://www.wga.hu.

Rinaldo Mantovano, Zephyr Blowing Psyche over the Sea. c.1527. Oil on stucco. Sala di Psiche, Palazzo del Tč, Mantua. From: The Web Gallery of Art, http://www.wga.hu.

– There is No Honor Among Thieves. Digital Image. Thecheifly.com. Accessed April 14, 2017. http://www.thechiefly.com/category/reads/

– Unknown, Ceremony of the Cult of Isis. 1st Century CE. Fresco. Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives, Vienna. Available from: ARTstor, http://www.artstor.org (accessed May 2, 2017).

– Unknown, Fresco from the Temple of Isis in Pompeii depicting Osiris-Serapide. 62-79 AD. Source: Carole Raddato, Naples – Italy. 2014, Digital Image. Available from: https://www.flickr.com/. (accessed May 2, 2017).

– Unknown, Isis Lamenting the Loss of Osiris. 1550-1292 BCE. Shaped, painted, and polished terracotta. The Louvre, Paris. Source: Gérard Ducher, Paris – France. 2006, Digital Image. Available from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/. (accessed May 2, 2017).

– Unknown, Lucius Apuleius Platonicus, Crabbes Historical Dictionary. 1825.
Lithograph. Bridgeman Art Library, London. From: Bridgeman Art Library, http://www.bridgemanimages.com/en-US/ (accessed May 2, 2017).

– Unknown, Sleeping Beauty. Movie. Directed by Les Clark, Eric Larson, and Wolfgang Reitherman, under the direction of Clyde Geronimi. 1959. Burbank, CA: Walk Disney Studios Motion Pictures, 1986.

– Vien, Joseph-Marie,  Psyché reconnaissant l’Amour endormi, 1761. Palais des Beaux-arts, Lille. Accessed May 2, 2017

– Walter Crane, Beauty and the Beast. 1874. Illustration, engraving. Minneapolis College of Art and Design Collection, Minneapolis, MN. Available from: Artstor, http://artstor.org (accessed May 2, 2017).

– Waterhouse, William, John, Psyche Opening the Golden Box. 1870 – 1917, England. Accessed May 2, 2017.

– The Wheel of Fortune. Digital Image. Wikipedia.org. Accessed April 14, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rota_Fortunae

– Sir William Beechey, Psyche returning from the Realms of Pluto. 1835. Steel-engraving, 99x81mm. Royal Academy of Arts, London. From: The Royal Collection, http://racollection.org.uk.

 

Feel free to contact us if you have suggestions, questions, comments, or concerns regarding this guide for further reading and research on The Golden Ass, Cupid and Psyche, or Apuleius himself.